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Women’s Vintage Magazines 1960-1980

 

Women’s Vintage Magazines 1960-1980 – A Perusal of Grandma’s Magazines

Women's Vintage Magazines 1960-1980This is about vintage women’s magazines, like my grandma’s, in 1960-1980.  Have you heard of The Workbasket and Women’s Household?  Within their covers, articles and patterns for quilt blocks, knitting, crocheting, embroidery, and sewing fill the pages.  Recipe sharing by readers could be found in a special section.  You could also find the hottest craft items to make for craft fairs.  My perusal of these magazines dated between 1960 and 1980 concluded a homemaker must have waited each month for the arrival of both of these magazines.

A point of interest was the change in prices of the magazines over the years.  Also, to have a classified ad printed cost increased in both magazines, however the difference in prices was considerable.  Women’s Household was charging 30 cents per word in 1972.  In contrast, The Workbasket in the same year was charging $2.50 per word.  The format was exactly the same and appeared to be from the same provider.  Perhaps The Workbasket exposure was greater, offering opportunity for more response.

Homemakers were the focal group of these two women’s vintage magazines during 1960-1980.  In fact, Women’s Household subtitle read “Where good and friendly neighbors meet”.  Do you know or have perused other vintage women’s magazines?

I am not really clear on how it came that I got my grandma’s magazines, but they are truly special to me.  I could not stop thinking possibly I was reading the same articles Grandma read.  She left clues to why she kept each magazine by writing on the cover what was inside that interested her.   I’m so happy to have this little bit of Grandma in my sewing room.

The role of women was evolving even when Grandma jotted down those notes.  Some of those recipes my grandma marked are as good today as they were when she made them, most likely.  Okay, I don’t think sauerkraut is good no matter when it is made.  Sorry, Grandma!